50 Years of Publications, 500 Books, FREE from the Met

If there’s one thing I love more than finding a good book, it might be finding a good book for free. The Metropolitain Museum of Art has made over 500 titles available for free download.

A few that caught my eye (and might catch yours):

The Development of Balto | Type Supply

Sure, the x-height changed, the spacing changed, the widths changed, the weight changed and the g changed, but overall? It’s pretty close. After looking at this, I started wondering: Why did it take me over six years to finish this!? To answer that question, I ventured deep into the depths of my hard drive…

via The Development of Balto | Type Supply.

A Typeface for the Underground – London Reconnections

The typeface was, of course, Johnston Sans and, although Eiichi didn’t know it at the time, it was a typeface created by Edward Johnston and unique to the London Underground. It was this typeface that helped motivate him into becoming a typographer and indirectly this that meant when Colin Banks (one of his course assessors and the “Banks” part of Banks & Miles) offered him a job as a typographer post-graduation, he leapt at the chance.

It was also this typeface, Colin Banks told him when he arrived, that Eiichi would be working on. He had been hired to redesign Johnston Sans.

“That morning,” says Eiichi, “was a bit of a shock.”

A Typeface for the Underground - London Reconnections

via A Typeface for the Underground – London Reconnections.

The Typography of Speed — re:form — Medium

Among other very insightful comments, he questioned my decision to bring the terminals [the tip-ends of the ‘S’] all the way around. His point was that it seemed out of character with the style. He was right. So, I went back to trying to figure that out. I opened the terminals back up. Then I opened them up as far as I could. That looked awful. Then I brought them back a little. Then some more. Then some more. Eventually I settled into something that I thought worked. These tiny things may seem like inconsequential details but they are very important. I teach type design and I like to tell my students that while these minuscule changes won’t be noticed by most people, they will be felt.


The Typography of Speed — re:form — Medium

The Typography of Speed — re:form — Medium

To create the Balto typeface, typographer Tal Leming tried numerous variations of every letter and symbol of the alphabet in various styles. The GIFs above show the transitions from start to finish for the letters G and W, rendered respectively in Balto Black right and Balto Ultra left.

via The Typography of Speed — re:form — Medium.


Read more:

The discovery of the first flexagon, a trihexaflexagon, is credited to the British student Arthur H. Stone, who was studying at Princeton University in the U.S.A. in 1939. His new paper in America wouldn’t fit in his English binder so he cut off the ends of the paper and began folding them into different shapes.[3] One of these formed a trihexaflexagon. Stone’s colleagues Bryant Tuckerman, Richard Feynman, and John Tukey became interested in the idea and formed the Princeton Flexagon Committee. Tuckerman worked out a topological method, called the Tuckerman traverse, for revealing all the faces of a flexagon.[4]

Flexagons were introduced to the general public by the recreational mathematician Martin Gardner, writing in 1956 in his first column of “Mathematical Games” for the Scientific American magazine.[5] In 1974, the magician Doug Henning included a construct-your-own hexaflexagon with the original cast recording of his Broadway show The Magic Show.

This is the perfectly likable Instagram image | VentureBeat

With 150 million users sharing 16 billion photos and liking a billion of them every single day, Instagram is getting to be a more and more crowded platform. As such, if you want to stand out, it’s getting harder and harder.

After analyzing over eight million images, Curulate found the common elements of shareable, likable Instagram images.

via This is the perfectly likable Instagram image | VentureBeat.

The Fiberglass Chairs: Something of How They Got the Way They Are

Today I bought a set of 14 Krueger fiberglass stacking chairs, found on Craigslist. While I wish they had been Eames, I’m not going to complain; their price and condition makes them great all-around use chairs (and for the price and condition I don’t need to worry about their collect-ability, instead enjoying them for their comfort and aesthetic).  In my review of the chairs I came upon this great video from Herman Miller on production of their fiberglass chairs.