Children’s language development: Talk and listen to them from birth.

Six years ago, Suskind noticed a disturbing trend among her patients at the University of Chicago Medicine: While children from affluent families were starting to speak after implant surgery, those from low-income families lagged behind.Why? The question ate at Suskind, who co-founded the hospital’s cochlear implant unit in 2006. She believes she discovered her answer in research by child psychologists Betty Hart and Todd R. Risley. Their landmark study in the 1990s found that a child born into poverty hears 30 million fewer words by age 3 than a child born to well-off parents, creating a gap in literacy preparation that has implications for a lifetime.

via Children’s language development: Talk and listen to them from birth..

Unwelcome tasks and burdens

…Town notables, as town autonomy vanished, found they had become subordinate implements of the imperial bureaucracy, and the life went out of their public functions, which grew every decade more disagreeable, more profitless and more oppressive. They had to be driven to their unwelcome tasks and burdens, which brought no real honor and gratified no ambition. Like beasts at the water-wheel, they plodded a dreary round to haul up the taxes needed by their rulers….

Previté-Orton, C. W.. The Shorter Cambridge Medieval History. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1978. Print

Explore – “Withdrawn from Circulation,” a gorgeous book…

 

“Withdrawn from Circulation,” a gorgeous book sculpture by artist Wendy Kawabata from this great New Yorker piece on book fetishists vs. anti-fetishists – a fine addition to this omnibus of extraordinary book sculptures.

via Explore – “Withdrawn from Circulation,” a gorgeous book….

Good to Great — Jim Collins

Good to Great - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Seven characteristics of companies that went “from good to great”

Level 5 Leadership: Leaders who are humble, but driven to do what’s best for the company.

First Who, Then What: Get the right people on the bus, then figure out where to go. Finding the right people and trying them out in different positions.

Confront the Brutal Facts: The Stockdale paradox – Confront the brutal truth of the situation, yet at the same time, never give up hope.

Hedgehog Concept: Three overlapping circles: What lights your fire (“passion”)? What could you be best in the world at (“best at”)? What makes you money (“driving resource”)?

Culture of Discipline: Rinsing the cottage cheese.

Technology Accelerators: Using technology to accelerate growth, within the three circles of the hedgehog concept.

The Flywheel: The additive effect of many small initiatives; they act on each other like compound interest.

via Good to Great – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Thomas Edison, Power-Napper: The Great Inventor on Sleep and Success | Brain Pickings

‘You lay down rather severe rules for one who wishes to succeed in life,’ I ventured, ‘working eighteen hours a day.’‘

Not at all,’ he said. ‘You do something all day long, don’t you? Every one does. If you get up at seven o’clock and go to bed at eleven, you have put in sixteen good hours, and it is certain with most men, that they have been doing something all the time. They have been either walking, or reading, or writing, or thinking. The only trouble is that they do it about a great many things and I do it about one. If they took the time in question and applied it in one direction, to one object, they would succeed. SucceAss is sure to follow such application. The trouble lies in the fact that people do not have an object one thing to which they stick, letting all else go. Success is the product of the severest kind of mental and physical application.’

via Thomas Edison, Power-Napper: The Great Inventor on Sleep and Success | Brain Pickings.