The Fiberglass Chairs: Something of How They Got the Way They Are

Today I bought a set of 14 Krueger fiberglass stacking chairs, found on Craigslist. While I wish they had been Eames, I’m not going to complain; their price and condition makes them great all-around use chairs (and for the price and condition I don’t need to worry about their collect-ability, instead enjoying them for their comfort and aesthetic).  In my review of the chairs I came upon this great video from Herman Miller on production of their fiberglass chairs.

Children’s language development: Talk and listen to them from birth.

Six years ago, Suskind noticed a disturbing trend among her patients at the University of Chicago Medicine: While children from affluent families were starting to speak after implant surgery, those from low-income families lagged behind.Why? The question ate at Suskind, who co-founded the hospital’s cochlear implant unit in 2006. She believes she discovered her answer in research by child psychologists Betty Hart and Todd R. Risley. Their landmark study in the 1990s found that a child born into poverty hears 30 million fewer words by age 3 than a child born to well-off parents, creating a gap in literacy preparation that has implications for a lifetime.

via Children’s language development: Talk and listen to them from birth..

The magic of Madison County | Iowa Now – The University of Iowa

With its friendly people, rolling scenery, and covered bridges etched with history, I can’t help but recommend a day trip to Winterset and Madison County. Not because you can get away from it all and experience life like it used to be in a simpler time as a lot of the marketing might suggest, but rather because you can experience life as it exists in this moment.

Along with most of my city-mates, I’ll say it’s good to call Madison County home.  Via The magic of Madison County | Iowa Now – The University of Iowa.

Confessions of a Cellphone Holdout – WSJ.com

I hope that I have a few more years left before I come to die, but I have gotten incalculable pleasure from not owning a cellphone, even if I never did make it, as Thoreau did, to the woods. But in a few weeks, I will buy a phone. I am scared. I am afraid of losing a small part of my identity, goodbye to No-Phone Gary, cousin to Dial-Up Dave, wherever you are. I’m afraid of becoming rude, of placing my phone faceup on a restaurant table, or playing "Words with Friends" at a funeral because the deceased did, after all, like words and have friends.What I’m most afraid of, though, is becoming a tool of my tool, of having one less weapon in the never-ending battle to protect—to paraphrase Saul Bellow, another hero—the territory of my consciousness. I have intentions to be a different kind of smartphone user. I’ll use it only when I travel. At home, I’ll stow it far away from me, in a terrarium, with a snake. I’ll never text.

via Confessions of a Cellphone Holdout – WSJ.com.

Can You Own a Birkin Bag and Still Be a Minimalist?

I have very little understanding of these brands, but I get the concept; I like it.

Imagine yourself in my make-believe Louboutins. If you have a bunch of other stuff lying around, filling up your home, adding to the clutter, how can you value your Birkin when it is surrounded by other things that are vying for your attention, removing your awareness from this object that you adore so much?The point is to remove all the extraneous stuff so that you can have the space – literally and figuratively – to focus all of your energy on the things that you value the most. There’s nothing minimal about this shift. It’s simple, it’s small, but it makes a world of difference. It has the capacity to encourage an expansion, not a contraction, of how you view your surroundings.

via Can You Own a Birkin Bag and Still Be a Minimalist?.