This is You on Smiles — Click the Shutter — Medium

Maybe it was a bad angle. Maybe I didn’t get his good side. Maybe he just didn’t have that surfer vibe. Whatever it was, the photo wasn’t all that cool. Given time to reflect (even the few days I used to get between my own childhood birthdays and my mom picking up a set of 4×6 prints at the local pharmacy), my son probably would’ve developed a version of that day that had him riding a giant a wave, looking like a cross between Laird Hamilton and Eddie Vedder. Instead, he pretty much looked like a landlocked three year-old on a beach-bound surfboard who was suffering from a rare — but particularly punishing — bad hair day.

The instant my son looked at the image, his imagination-driven perception of himself was replaced by a digital reproduction of the moment he had just experienced. He had a few seconds, not nearly long enough, to create his own internal version of what that moment looked — and by extension felt — like.

It’s impossible to create a mental picture of a moment when a digital version of that moment is staring you in the face (and often within seconds, the Facebook too).

via This is You on Smiles — Click the Shutter — Medium.

The Gadget I Love/Hate: Kyle Cassidy & Micro Four Thirds Cameras — People & Gadgets — Medium

Kyle is also a fan of technology & the internet: he was one of the first photographers to put a portfolio onto the Web, and is a contributing editor for Videomaker magazine. He has also written technical books on subjects like Windows 2000 network administration and enterprise security, so he clearly has no fear of getting deeply involved with technology.So what gadget does Kyle love and hate? Currently, he’s experimenting with the Micro Four Thirds system, a new camera format that is smaller than the Digital SLR DSLR cameras he uses for most of his work.

via The Gadget I Love/Hate: Kyle Cassidy & Micro Four Thirds Cameras — People & Gadgets — Medium.

The illusion of simplicity: photographer Peter Belanger on shooting for Apple | The Verge

At one point I decided I wanted to learn a bit more about the commercial side of photography and applied for an internship in San Francisco. I could see there was a lot of work in the area for commercial photographers due to all the product companies around Silicon Valley. This was when desktop publishing and computers were just taking off. I liked the aspect of working with clients and solving puzzling challenges with each job. I also liked that it seemed I could actually make a living doing what I loved.

via The illusion of simplicity: photographer Peter Belanger on shooting for Apple | The Verge.

Explore – The best advice I can come up with is this: Keep…

The best advice I can come up with is this: Keep your living expenses LOW. The smaller you live (materially-speaking), the bigger you can live (creatively-speaking). This way the stakes aren’t so high…you aren’t demanding of your passion that it keeps you living a rich life. Then you can stretch and grow with the most possible freedom. This was my strategy in my 20’s, and it’s the reason I worked really hard to avoid all debts, and to keep my lifestyle really manageable. If I’d been saddled with a big life, I don’t think I ever could have found my way forward to the freedom I have now.

Elizabeth Gilbert’s advice for people who want to turn their passion into a career, a fine addition to our ongoing archive of sage advice.

via Explore – The best advice I can come up with is this: Keep….