Roland TR-909 – A personal introduction

By the time I’d left for college I was familiar with the sounds of the Roland TR-909 drum machine. Daft Punk’s Homework (which had been only recently introduced to me) and it’s overt ode to the machine, Revolution 909, were on regular rotation. I could play reasonable emulations of the classic drums through my ROMpler. From the awe-inspiring (and GAS-inducing) liner photos of Fatboy Slim’s You’ve Come a Long Way, Baby I knew what the machine itself looked like.  I’d never *seen one, though.  Never experienced one…

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Primitive Technology: Forge Blower

I invented the Bow Blower, a combination of the bow drill and forge blower to make a device that can force air into a fire while being easy to construct from commonly occurring natural materials using only primitive technology. I began by fanning a fire with a piece of bark to increase its temperature. It is this basic principle I improved on throughout the project.

What The Hell Was Megadeth, Arizona? — Cuepoint — Medium

This is the story of how an unlikely threesome—a girl, a heavy metal band and their fans — pioneered the web at its infancy, bucked the status quo and proved that the Internet wasn’t a fad.

It’s 1994. I’m working at Capitol Records in Hollywood, California.

via What The Hell Was Megadeth, Arizona? — Cuepoint — Medium.

Work Habits at Apple – Ole Begemann

Melton: Oh, Christ! Yeah, exactly, I couldn’t do that. I had to do something right away. I said in the article that I wrote for The Loop magazine, when Steve asked you a question you didn’t ramble and whatever you did, you didn’t make up an answer. And if you didn’t know, you said that you didn’t know. And more importantly, you told him when you would have an answer.

So sometimes, when you would get these emails, you’d had to be blunt and say: “I don’t know. Here’s what I’m doing to get you that answer and when I expect it”, you said as your kids were begging you to go out and see this nice sight in France or wherever the hell you were at. I mean, that’s just what you did.

And I have sometimes have young people come up to me today and ask me about being successful in this business. And part of it is just dumb luck, being in the right place at the right time. Thank God I listened to my wife when I took that job at Apple.

But the other thing is, you have to realize to really be successful to a sin, it’s kind of a Faustian bargain you make. If you’re not willing to pay that price, it’s not gonna come to you. I hate to say that. And so you have to ask yourself, is that really the way you wanna live your life? ’Cause it’s not like I recommend it, either. You have to think long and hard about that.

And I know I’ve read a lot of studies how this is a stupid way for the tech industry to function. And that’s certainly true. But this happens all over, and it’s not just the tech industry, it’s just I think in the tech industry it’s on steroids […]. But damn, there is no way you can cruise through a job at Apple, Inc. That just does not happen for anybody I’ve ever seen.

via Work Habits at Apple – Ole Begemann.

Nest: Just another big data source for the all-seeing, all-knowing future Google | VentureBeat | Business | by Ricardo Bilton

At any given time Google, through its various services and devices, knows, well, a lot:

What you’re searching for

What you are talking about when you email friends (and, through Google+, who those friends are)

Where you live, and work, how long you stay at either location each day

What you’re watching on your phone, tablet,or television

Where you are in the world, and, with Glass, what you’re looking at

And that’s just what I could come up with off the top of my head.

If you connect the dots here, it should be clear what Google doesn’t know, and where Nest fits in. Google has no idea what your energy consumption habits are, a data void that makes it impossible for it to make other, more significant insights.

via Nest: Just another big data source for the all-seeing, all-knowing future Google | VentureBeat | Business | by Ricardo Bilton.

Netflix is Sabotaging Itself – on Purpose

This is beautiful:

SAN FRANCISCO — What does not kill me, makes me stronger. So said Nietzsche, Conan the Barbarian, and Kelly Clarkson.

Now Netflix cloud director Ariel Tseitlin is taking that philosophy to its natural limit in the world of the cloud. Every day, he unleashes an army of virtual monkeys on his company’s computing infrastructure, trying to kill it. Every day, it survives — and it gets stronger, more resilient, and more resistant to real outages. By now, it is almost unkillable.

As a result, Netflix has managed to stay online even while other users of Amazon’s cloud system have gone offline.

“Their sole purpose is to make sure that we’re failing in a consistent and frequent enough way to make sure that we don’t drift into overall failure,” Tseitlin said today at CloudBeat 2013, VentureBeat’s conference on the enterprise cloud.

from VentureBeat.