EarlyE: 476 Tracks Covering the History of Electronic Music

http://ubu.com/sound/electronic.html

via http://ubu.com/sound/electronic.html

…Caio Barros was an undergrad studying composition when he began digitizing his professor’s sizable collection of electronic music CDs in 2009. To increase its chances of mass distribution, he converted the collection into a torrent file. But somehow, that torrent disappeared from cyberspace. Now, for the first time, ubuweb is hosting this massive collection of early electronic works in its entirety.

Cembalet.com

I’ll be adding information about my experience with the Hohner Cembalet both at Phil.tv and Cembalet.com.  Current plans are to run through:

• bypassing the footswell switch
• cleaning out the case
• the “found” state of my Cembalet N
• manufacturing “strikers”

I’ve pushed a very rough HTML page to Cembalet.com; if you can get past the spartan appearance a few of those links will send you to some of the information that’s helped me to date.

What The Hell Was Megadeth, Arizona? — Cuepoint — Medium

This is the story of how an unlikely threesome—a girl, a heavy metal band and their fans — pioneered the web at its infancy, bucked the status quo and proved that the Internet wasn’t a fad.

It’s 1994. I’m working at Capitol Records in Hollywood, California.

via What The Hell Was Megadeth, Arizona? — Cuepoint — Medium.

The Development of Balto | Type Supply

Sure, the x-height changed, the spacing changed, the widths changed, the weight changed and the g changed, but overall? It’s pretty close. After looking at this, I started wondering: Why did it take me over six years to finish this!? To answer that question, I ventured deep into the depths of my hard drive…

via The Development of Balto | Type Supply.

A Typeface for the Underground – London Reconnections

The typeface was, of course, Johnston Sans and, although Eiichi didn’t know it at the time, it was a typeface created by Edward Johnston and unique to the London Underground. It was this typeface that helped motivate him into becoming a typographer and indirectly this that meant when Colin Banks (one of his course assessors and the “Banks” part of Banks & Miles) offered him a job as a typographer post-graduation, he leapt at the chance.

It was also this typeface, Colin Banks told him when he arrived, that Eiichi would be working on. He had been hired to redesign Johnston Sans.

“That morning,” says Eiichi, “was a bit of a shock.”

A Typeface for the Underground - London Reconnections

via A Typeface for the Underground – London Reconnections.

The Typography of Speed — re:form — Medium

Among other very insightful comments, he questioned my decision to bring the terminals [the tip-ends of the ‘S’] all the way around. His point was that it seemed out of character with the style. He was right. So, I went back to trying to figure that out. I opened the terminals back up. Then I opened them up as far as I could. That looked awful. Then I brought them back a little. Then some more. Then some more. Eventually I settled into something that I thought worked. These tiny things may seem like inconsequential details but they are very important. I teach type design and I like to tell my students that while these minuscule changes won’t be noticed by most people, they will be felt.

 

The Typography of Speed — re:form — Medium

The Typography of Speed — re:form — Medium

To create the Balto typeface, typographer Tal Leming tried numerous variations of every letter and symbol of the alphabet in various styles. The GIFs above show the transitions from start to finish for the letters G and W, rendered respectively in Balto Black right and Balto Ultra left.

via The Typography of Speed — re:form — Medium.